First Sprouts of Spring

Every year I try to grow at least a little bit of my food. Sometimes it’s just one or two things in pots and sometimes it’s a full blown garden. Last year I built a raised bed garden and went a little wild growing winter squash. This year, I’ve steered clear of squash and am focusing on some early cool weather vegetables like snap peas, radishes and brocolli.

The other day I saw the first sprouts of the year popping up through the soil. I’m sure a couple of months from now I’ll be grumbling about having to water and weedevery day. But until then, I’ll be enjoying seeing the new life coming up and anticipating it growing into something I can use. Oh, and I’ll also be futily trying to keep my dog from walking through the bed.

Doing Nothing No More

Sometimes I find myself paralyzed by indecision. I have so many things I want to do but I end up doing nothing. I think I fear not being able to finish something so I never start. The promise of what could be completed and the hope of that future completion is a powerful sedative. The dream becomes the goal rather than the realization of the dream. When you do nothing with your dreams, you risk nothing and you have no potential for failure.

But, at the same time, if you avoid risk and failure your whole life, then you risk failure of your life.

So what’s the solution? Is there a magic bullet that gets a person motivated and kicks them into gear? Yes and no. There are many motivators in the world but I don’t think there are any universal ones. I’ve found that the best solution and the one that comes closest to working for everyone is to just start moving.

Make a single brush stroke, write one line of code/poetry/your story, take a picture, get a person’s phone number out, or put one thing away. Each of these things is an accomplishment in itself and can then act as a springboard for doing more. Your brain will feel the pleasure of an accomplishment and will crave more. This craving will almost always be more powerful than the sedative of dreaming without doing.

Tactile Warning Devices

This is a tactile warning device, also-known-as truncated domes. Truncated domes are a much better description since they actually are domes with their tops cut flat. They are meant to be a warning to anyone stepping on them or rolling over them that they are about to enter a street or parking lot.

However, the word tactile means a sense of touch. Unless you are down on your hands and knees, running your hands across the truncated domes, you’re actually feeling them (through your feet or bottom), not touching them. So the phrase “tactile warning device” is not entirely accurate. I just thought you ought to know.

The Wonder in the Mundane

I’ve continued my investigations into the gutters of my neighborhood and beyond and found more wonders that usually go unnoticed. I’m not sure how long this will last though. I like looking down to the small things around me but sometimes you have to look up and notice the larger world around you.

The trick is to see it all and not neglect any one part. Of course, I’m much more comfortable droning through life not noticing anything around me. But comfort is boring and doesn’t help you grow. I have to constantly fight the tendency to shut off the thinking part of my brain.

That’s one of the benefits of conciously looking for the minutae around you; finding the wonder in the mundane; enriching your life with the world that’s actually around you that your brain often filters out as unnecessary. So for now I’ll keep looking to the gutter as a way of lifting myself above complacency.